We all know that color plays an important role in how we view things, which is a huge part of how we market to customers. However, the color scheme of your marketing is only one aspect of the “color of your marketing.” If you are not achieving the results that you think your campaign or your product deserves, perhaps it is time to ensure that your “marketing color” coincides with your company vision and branding. Let’s take a look.

The Color Wheel & Your Marketing Campaign

Since the days of Edward Bernays, we have known that putting a lot of red in your ad means “there’s a problem; buy quickly, and buy right now.” If you put a lot of blue in your ad means “we’re trustworthy; buy a lot later.” Fast food restaurants use copious amounts of red and purple in their wallpaper to engender feelings of excitement and encourage people to buy on impulse. Note Ronald McDonald’s bright red-toned outfit. How then, would an ad full of blue flowers fare for the company. Likely not too well.

Staying True to Your Company Vision

Along with no blue flower ads, McDonald’s would also never publish a “blue” commercial, blue meaning sad. Every McDonald’s character is happy and smiling, lending a decidedly un-blue air to the culture and the image of McDonald’s. Once the company starts down this road, there is no turning back. The company vision is about action, happiness and buying right now.

What Color is Your Marketing?

Do the colors in your ads match your marketing personality? Or do they clash? In the world of advertising, there is nothing worse than a mixed message. If you are putting a great deal of production value in your commercials and they still aren’t working, then maybe you should look at the color of the personality in those ads. If it does not match, then take the time to fix it.

This speaks to a larger message of consistency in your outreach that must permeate all aspects of your marketing. It can be more difficult than you think to keep to a single message, so don’t give up on yourself quickly if things don’t work. Study the psychology behind the colors that you are using and match them to the message that you are trying to send to your customer base.

It is also true that you may want to segway your prospects through a color change as they move through the customer journey. This is especially true for big ticket items and B2B sales that have long decision trails. You don’t want to start off with red ads in this case – you may scare off your customer before he is “ripe” for the buy! You want to put this at the end of the journey with blues and whites at the beginning to reel them in.

In short, keep an eye on the colors that you use and the color of your overall marketing. The better that you match these two things, the more optimally you can expect your ads to perform.

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